Reasoning Quiz – Inequalities – IBPS Clerk Prelims 2018 – 1

Hello and welcome to exampundit. Here is a set of Reasoning Quiz for IBPS Clerk Prelims 2018 on Inequalities.

The following reasoning quiz has 11 questions from Inequalities with 10 minutes.

The following set of quiz is created as per the standards of upcoming IBPS Clerk Prelims exam 2018.

Quiz Name: Reasoning Quiz for Bank Clerk Prelims Exam

Time: 10 Minutes

Difficulty Level: Moderate

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Reasoning Quiz – Inequalities – IBPS Clerk Prelims 2018 – 1

Directions (Qs.1-5): In the following questions, the symbols @, #, $, * and % are used as illustrated below:

‘P @ Q’ means ‘P is not smaller than Q’.

‘P # Q’ means ‘P is neither greater than nor equal to Q’.

‘P $ Q’ means ‘P is neither smaller than nor greater than Q’.

‘P * Q’ means ‘P is not greater than Q’.

‘P % Q’ means ‘P is neither smaller than nor equal to Q’.

Now, in each of the following questions assuming the given statements to be true, find which of the two conclusions I and II given below them is/are definitely true? Give answer

(a) if only Conclusion I is true.

(b) if only Conclusion II is true.

(c) if either Conclusion I or II is true.

(d) if neither Conclusion I nor II is true.

(e) if both Conclusions I and II are true.

 

  1. Statements:

M $ K, D * K, R # K

Conclusions:

(I) D $ M

(II) M % D

Show Solution
(c) M = K .…. (i);
D ≤ K ….. (ii);
R < K ..… (iii)
From (i) and (ii), we get
M = K ≥ D –> M ≥ D
Hence, either M > D (conclusion II) or M = D(conclusion I) is true

 

 

  1. Statements:

F * M, M % R, E @ F

Conclusions:

(I) M % E

(II) R @ E

Show Solution
(d) F ≤ M… (i); M > R… (ii); E ≥ F… (iii)
From (i) and (iii), no specific relation can be obtained between M and E. Similarly, no specific relation can be obtained between R and E.

 

  1. Statements:

H $ K, T # H, W * T

Conclusions:

(I) K % W

(II) T # K

Show Solution
(e) H = K… (i); T < H…(ii),
W≤T …(iii)
From (i), (ii) and (iii), we get
K = H > T ≥ W –> K > W (conclusion I) and
T < K (conclusion II).

 

  1. Statements:

N % A, A # L, F $ N

Conclusions:

(I) L % F

(II) F % A

Show Solution
(b) N > A… (i), A < L… (ii), F = N…(iii)
From (i) and (iii), we get
F = N > A–> F > A (conclusion II). But no specific relation can be obtained between L and F. Hence, conclusion I is not necessarily true.

 

  1. Statements:

B * D, D $ M, F % M

Conclusions:

(I) B # M

(II) F % B

Show Solution
(b) B < D…(i); D = M…(ii);
F > M …(iii)
From (i), (ii) and (iii), we get
F > M = D > B –> B < M and F > B (conclusion II).
Since, B < M, therefore, conclusion I is not necessarily true.

 

Directions (Qs. 6-11): In the following questions the symbols +, ×, ?, @ and $ are used with the following meanings:

P + Q means P is neither smaller nor greater than Q.

P × Q’means P is neither equal to nor smaller than Q.

P ? Q means P is neither greater than nor equal to Q.

P @ Q means P is either greater than or equal to Q.

P $ Q means P is not equal to Q.

Now, in each of the following questions assuming the given statements to be true, find which of the two conclusions I and II given below them is/are definitely true. Give answer

(a) if only conclusion I is true;

(b) if only conclusion II is true;

(c) if either I or II is true:

(d) if neither I nor II is true; and

(e) if both I and II are true.

 

  1. Statement:

P $ Q, Q × R, P + R

Conclusions:

(I) Q × P

(II) P ? Q

Show Solution
(e) P ≠ Q …(i), Q > R … (ii), P = R …(iii)
From (ii) and (iii), we get Q > R = P –> Q > P. Hence,
Both I and II are true.

 

 

  1. Statement:

A + B, B $ C, C ? A

Conclusions:

(I) C $ A

(II) B + C

Show Solution
(a) A = B … (i), B≤ C … (ii), C < A … (iii) From (iii), conclusion I is true. II contradicts statement (ii), hence, it is not true.

 

 

  1. Statement:

Y @ Z, Z × Q, Q $ P

Conclusions:

(I) Y ? Q

(II) Y ? P

Show Solution
(d) Y≥ Z …(i), Z > Q … (ii), Q ÷ P …(iii)
From (i) and (ii), we get Y > Z > Q –> Y > Q … (A)
Hence, I is not true. From (iii), two possible relationships between P and Q are;
Case I: When P > Q
Now, using (A), we get Y > Q < P –> no conclusion.
Case II: When Q > P
using (A), we get Y > Q > P –> Y > P. Hence, II is not true.

 

 

  1. Statement:

E × F, F @ L, L+ N

Conclusions:

(I) N + F

(II) E × L

Show Solution
(b) E > F …. (i), F > L … (ii), L = N …(iii)
From (ii) and (iii), we get F≥ L= N –> F≥ N or N′ F.
Hence, I may be true but not necessarily so.
From (i) and (ii), we get E > F > L –> E > L
Hence, II is true.

 

 

  1. Statement:

H @ J. J ? K, K × M

Conclusions:

(I) H @ M

(II) M × J

Show Solution
(d) H ≥ J … (i), J < K … (ii), K > M … (iii)
From (ii) and (iii), we get J < K > M fi no relationship
between J and M can be established. Hence, II can’t
be established. Again, combining all we can’t conclude
Thee relationship between H and M. Hence, I is not true.

 

 

  1. Statement:

M @ T, T + V, V ? E

Conclusions:

(I) V + M

(II) V ? M

Show Solution
(c) M ≥ T … (i), T = V …. (ii), V < E …(iii)
From (i) and (ii), we get
M ≥ T = Vfi M ≥ V –> ei–>er V = M or V < M is true.

 

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